Niagara Naturists News
February 15, 2018

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A quick reminder, Our next meet and greet will be on February 17th at the Hillview Restaurant which is located at 6135 Transit Road, Depew, NY.  They have a private meeting room.  We will start at 5:45PM. From 5:45 to 6:00pm is a meet and greet portion with dinner starting at 6:00PM.

Remember, anybody can come to our dinner meetings.  Please come, ask questions, and see what the club is all about.  All are welcome. 

A belated Valentines Day greeting.

Nude Valentine

The Winter Olympics  are in full swing.

Did you know that the original athletes competed in the nude?  You would have to be tough to do that at the winter Olympics

10 Fascinating Facts About the Ancient Olympic Games

2. The Prudes Wore Penis Restraints

http://www.niagaranaturists.org/images/kynodesme.jpgDid I say all athletes competed naked in the Ancient Olympics? Silly me - actually, not all of them were naked.

Some wore a kynodesme (literally a "dog leash"), a thin leather thong used as a penis restraint:

[The kynodesme] was tied tightly around the part of the foreskin that extended beyond the glans. The kynodesme could then either be attached to a waist band to expose the scrotum, or tied to the base of the penis so that the penis appeared to curl upwards.

3. A Chef Won the Very First Olympic Games

The very first recorded Ancient Olympic Games took place in 776 BC. The event was a stadion race (a foot race equivalent to a 190-m or 208-yard dash). The winner was a humble baker from the Greek city state of Elis named Coroebus (also spelled Koroibos).

For the first 13 games, the stadion race was the only competition. At the 14th Ancient Olympic Games, a double race was added.

4. ... and He Won ... An Olive Branch!

http://www.niagaranaturists.org/images/olive-wreath-ancient-olympics.jpg


An Olympionike or a winner of an event receiving an olive wreath and red ribbons
(Epiktetos Painter, 520 - 510 BC - from
mlahanas.de)

Yup - that's because the Ancient Olympic Games didn't have any medals or prizes. Winners of the competitions won olive wreaths, branches, as well as woolen ribbons. Oh, that and the all important honor.

They did, however, come home as heroes - and got showered with gifts there. Many victors subsequently used their fame to endorse products and to get paid posing for sculptures and drawings (just like today, huh?)

Alex Santoso • Saturday, August 2, 2008 at 1:48 AM • 23

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